Iron Market News Directory

Big 3 Iron Miners Keeping Up Volume, Price Balancing Act

Reuters columnist Clyde Russell wrote today that iron ore miners BHP Billiton (NYSE:BHP) Rio Tinto (NYSE:RIO) and Vale (NYSE:VALE) are bent on keeping their dominant position in the market by increasing low cost production. The strategy will depend on whether demand from China will continue to support prices, according to the author.

India Not Planning to Restrict Exports of Iron Ore

The Deccan Chronicle Reported that although India is attempting to curb illegal money, the country will not restrict its exports of iron ore. According to the Chronicle, Minister of State for Steel Vishnu Deo Sai has stated that the country will still have enough ore to supply domestic steelmakers.

Indonesia Resumes Export of Some Metal Ore Concentrates

Mineweb reported today that shipments of iron ore, lead, and zinc have left Indonesia following the implementation of a mineral export ban from the country in January. Two firms, Sebuku Iron Lateritic Ores and Lumbung Mineral Sentosa, agreed to pay a controversial 20 percent export tax, according to Mineweb.

Long Term Iron Price Will Be $110 a Ton, Vale CEO

Bloomberg reported this week that Vale CEO, Murilo Ferreira sees iron ore prices coming back up to $110 a pound on growing demand from China. Together with fellow major miners like Rio Tinto (NYSE:RIO), Vale is upping its mine production on the belief that higher volumes will balance lower prices, according to Bloomberg.

Financial Flexibility Could Be a Saving Grace for Iron Miners, S&P Credit Analysts

Mineweb today drew attention to observations from Standard & Poor’s Ratings Services that iron ore prices could hurt some iron miners if they end up staying at $90 a ton for 2015. S&P analysts said that although larger companies would likely be able to adapt while some smaller, more iron focus companies might be put at a greater risk, either might just be able to weather the storm with good management and financial strategies.

Tighter Checks Could Measure China’s Iron and Copper Imports

The Wall Street Journal reported that, as Chinese officials continue to investigate allegations that some traders illegally pledged copper and iron as collateral to more than one lender, delays in clearing imports could disrupt trade for the base metals.